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Robert  Guth

"SW Florida native, experienced Realtor, 
Mortgage Expert, on your side 7 days per week"

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How to sell your home quickly, and for the highest price....

Posted on May 29, 2014 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

The key to selling your home is exposure. Exposure causes traffic, traffic causes offers, offers cause bidding wars. If you have 1 or 2 showings per week, and low or no offers, your confidence will be slowly squeezed from your body. Whereas if you had 10-15 showings per week, and multiple offers, you suddenly feel in the driver's seat, and in complete control. Price is not everything. Exposure is the key. Though listing for the right price is the driving factor, you only need one buyer. Correct? Herding potential buyers through your home will increase your odds across the board. Listing your home and waiting for the phone to ring is one way. I prefer to work.

 

I have a track record of taking over stale listings, and selling them quickly for full or close to full price. I recently took over a listing that had been on the market for 6 months, with the highest offer being $420,000. I was mocked by an agent who sharply told me I would never sell it for more than $420,000. I sold it for $485,000, cash, no inspection contingency with a $20,000 non-refundable deposit. The great thing is, this is public record so it can be verified. Don't take my word for it.

 

Selling a home is all about exposure. That is what I specialize in. Over 85% of buyers locate their home online now. That is where I come in. I list homes aggressively by blasting it to dozens and dozens of real estate based websites. I tweet it, Instagram it, Facebook it, and Pinterest it. I list it overseas, translated in 11 languages including listing it with a Chinese website for billionaire investors. I hold open houses, and blast out invitations to 1000's of agents with clients looking. I create virtual tours, videos, professional presentations, and websites just for your home. Your home is listed locally, nationally, and internationally. I feature your home on the top 5 search sites, such as Trulia.com. I advertise in local print, such as The Real Estate Book. Even my signs get more exposure, as they stand tall and beautiful, featuring an 800# "Call Capture" system with 24 recorded message about your home, and a dedicated Text line to cover all social preferences. The sign offers a secure "info box" that holds fliers with your home's info and pictures so potential buyers cruising their favorite neighborhoods "home browsing" can learn about your home 7 days a week.

 

I sold a home last Monday that again, had been on the market for 6 long painful months for the seller. The listing expired, I took over, went crazy marketing the home, and secured a cash buyer within 3 weeks.....for the exact....I'm sorry, for $500 higher than the seller had hoped for from the beginning. Again, call or email me and I can provide actual addresses and data. Real, true results, all public record.

 

Exposure. Some agents have it, some don't. Effort is the difference. I approach selling a home with a torch in one hand, and a sword in the other.

 

I'm not a "wait for the phone to ring in between rounds of golf" type of agent. I specialize in kicking butt. I didn't dip my toe in the water when I was a kid, I did cannonballs.

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Can you compete in a bidding war?

Posted on May 29, 2014 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (2)

Your first steps should be to consult with your Realtor, and make sure you have a full understanding of your parameters whether you are financing or paying cash. You will formulate a plan of attack with your Realtor, and consider your options. But in today's market, very often you will find your self in a bidding war. Whether it is because of price, neighborhood, or size, if you are interested, so are others.

 

Some of my clients have been suprised to hear that it isn't just always about the highest bid.

 

Here are some other techniques and considerations that can help win the bid for you:

 

Solid financing: You may be competing against cash buyers, so make sure that your loan preapproval is in place and that you have completed all required documentation other than identifying a specific property.

 

Eliminate contingencies—carefully: If you own a home now, you may want to offer to buy another home without making your contract contingent on the sale of your current home. You take the risk of carrying two mortgages for a while, so make sure you can safely handle the payments. You can also decide to have an “information only” home inspection rather than making your offer contingent on the outcome of the inspection.

 

Make the settlement date convenient for the sellers: Rather than negotiating on a closing date that’s convenient to all sides, you can tell the sellers you’ll work with their schedule or rent back the property to them after the closing.

 

Offer to pay all closing costs: You can reduce the sellers’ out-of-pocket expenses by offering to pay their share of the settlement fees, but before you do this get an accurate estimate of what those costs will be and make sure you have the funds available to pay them. In many cases, this may be less than $1000-$1500. If you are neck and neck with another bid, that could be the deal breaker.

 

Personalize the transaction: Sometimes the tipping point for sellers who receive multiple offers is something emotional rather than financial. A personal letter describing your love of their home may tilt the scale in your favor.

 

Try an escalation clause: You can add an escalation clause to your offer that increases your bid by a certain amount above other offers. Just make sure you sent a limit on how high your offer will go.

 

Control yourself: Remember that any offer is subject to an appraisal (unless you waive that contingency, but that’s not recommended unless you have plenty of cash), so be careful not to bid above the market value of any property.

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Pricing Right Is Key To Selling Your Home

Posted on May 27, 2014 at 11:50 AM Comments comments (0)

When you decide to sell your home, you want the highest possible return from its sale. Determining price is the most critical step in preparing your home for sale.

 

Obviously, pricing your property too low won't provide the best return. You are apt to be deluged with lookers and may get many offers, but you could lose thousands of dollars on your family's largest investment.

 

Likewise, pricing a property too high is risky. Homes priced too high miss their target market. Qualified buyers who might find the home just right for their needs won't see your home, or make an offer on it, because it is out of their price range. If they are shown an overpriced home during its early marketing stages and do not buy because it isn't a good value, they are unlikely to revisit your home once the price is lowered. Real estate agents will hesitate to show an overpriced home, unless it will make a competing property look like a better value.

 

Many home sellers make a mistake by implementing the 'let's try it and see' pricing attitude. But testing the market can be dangerous. A property receives its best exposure during the first three to five weeks on the market.

 

If your home is priced right from the outset, you maximize your opportunity of reaching the most qualified buyers. Buyers who have seen most available homes in their price range are waiting for the right house to come on the market. This is why a well priced home often sells quickly once it is put on the market.

 

Multiple listing association statistics show that the longer a home is on the market, the lower the selling price. The home becomes stale and a price reduction results.

 

Pricing a home is part art and part science. It's based on hard evidence by looking at sale prices for comparable properties. But, no two homes are identical. That means the evidence must be evaluated by an experienced sales associate, like myself.

 

The right price really is the right price range to attract the maximum number of qualified buyers within a time frame that suits the sellers' needs. Pricing strategy depends on the market conditions at the time your home is put up for sale. It can best be determined by an agent who is active in the market, who constantly views homes and is monitoring the changing market conditions.

 

If you need help to determine the right price for your home, in order to sell your home in the least amount of time for the highest return, please contact me for a comparative market analysis and consultation.

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Affordable Pool Homes in Cape Coral Under $150,000? You bet...

Posted on May 22, 2014 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

There are 56 single family pool homes under $150,000 in Cape Coral as of today.

Wanna see?

Check them out for yourself, and then let's go take a look:

 

http://www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com/search

(be sure to click the "private pool" button before hitting "search")

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Affordable Waterfront Property in Cape Coral? You Bet....

Posted on May 21, 2014 at 11:40 AM Comments comments (0)

As of this morning, there are 166 waterfront properties for sale under $200,000 in Cape Coral.

 

Want to see them?

 

Go to: (be sure to click the "waterfront" button)

 

http://www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com/search

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Making An Offer

Posted on May 14, 2014 at 11:40 AM Comments comments (0)

When a buyer makes an offer to purchase your home, your Real Estate Professional will contact you promptly. The Real Estate Professional will scrutinize the document, review it with you carefully, and answer your questions. The written offer is important because it lays out all the terms of the proposed transaction and will become a binding contract if you sign it. The offer states the price the buyer is willing to pay and the financing terms, such as assuming your loan or arranging a new loan.

 

The offer may be contingent on the buyer's selling a home first, or obtaining an inspection. Ask the Real Estate Professional how these terms affect you and whether the offer is reasonable and in line with the market. The offer describes the property, states who pays for which closing costs, and specifies dates of closing and possession. Along with making the offer, the buyer may place some earnest money with the escrow agent as a sign of good faith. The earnest money will be kept in an escrow account and applied to the buyer's down payment or closing costs when the sale closes.

 

Your options

In reviewing the offer, you have three options: accept, reject, or make a counteroffer. A counteroffer is a rejection of a buyer's offer with a simultaneous offer from you to the buyer. In making your decision, carefully review the figures compiled earlier to determine your net proceeds. Because the terms and estimated closing costs may be quite different from earlier calculations, you will want to discuss the possibilities with your Real Estate Professional. You are also encouraged to seek the advice of an attorney and a tax adviser.

 

Seller's Disclosure

In most residential sales, a seller will deliver a Seller's Disclosure Notice to a buyer on or before the effective date of a contract to purchase the property. The notice is required by law to be delivered. It provides important information about the seller's knowledge of the condition of the property. Complete the notice to your best knowledge and belief. Your Real Estate Professional will most likely ask that you complete the notice at the time the listing is first taken. Copies of the completed notice will be made available to the prospects looking at your property.

 

Lead-Based Paint Disclosure

If your property was built before 1978, federal law requires that before a buyer is obligated under a contract to buy the property, the seller shall: 1) provide the buyer with a lead hazard information pamphlet (as prescribed by EPA); 2) disclose the presence of any known lead-based paint or hazard; 3) provide the buyer with a lead hazard evaluation report or records available to the seller; and 4) permit the buyer to conduct a risk assessment or inspection for the presence of lead-based paint or hazards. A contract for the sale of property built before 1978 must contain a statutorily prescribed Lead Warning Statement to the buyer. Your Real Estate Professional will provide you with the forms necessary to comply with their law and will suggest procedures to follow in order to comply.

Accepting the offer

Once you and the buyer agree on terms and sign the contract, the buyer will generally have to find a lender and apply for a loan. Your Real Estate Professional may monitor the loan process, which could last several weeks. During this time, your Real Estate Professional will also be busy coordinating other arrangements to prepare for the final sale.

 

Title search

As part of the process, the title company may order a survey of your property and research the title to your home, making sure the chain of title is clear. Clearing the title may require paying off liens - that is, any monetary claims - against your property. Examples are mechanic's liens, unpaid state and federal tax liens, court judgments, and probate considerations (if a co-owner has died). The product of the title search can be in the form of title insurance, abstract of title, or certificate of title, depending on what is commonly used in your area.

 

Inspection and repairs

If the buyer requires inspections of your home, your Real Estate Professional may coordinate the scheduling of inspectors. A buyer may hire an inspector to review many items in the property such as the structural components, mechanical items, electrical systems and plumbing systems. The inspector will report to the buyer the items that the inspector finds to be in need of repair. Most likely the buyer will provide a copy of the inspection report to you and may ask you to complete certain repairs. Do not be surprised when the inspection notes some items in need of repair. An inspector is trained to see items and defects that are not obvious to you and your Real Estate Professional. No matter how new or well maintained a home is, an inspector may very well find some items in need of repair.

 

I am here to help you, 7 days a week. Just call or email. It will be a pleasure to assist you.

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

How to Counter Offer: Strategies

Posted on May 13, 2014 at 11:40 AM Comments comments (0)

The art of the deal is negotiating. The goal, when you're countering a buyer's offer, is to get the highest price and best terms possible. Once you reject the initial offer, you must decide how much to counter. The answer is easy when the market is hot. You will counter at full price or more.

 

If the market is normal, you may receive less than full price for your property. In this case, one strategy would be to set your asking price higher than normal. How much lower than your asking price will you counter-offer?

 

Beware of Setting a Minimum Counter Price.

 

Setting a firm minimum counter price is a big mistake that some sellers make. Depending on the deal and the buyer your counter offer should be flexible. For example, after investigating the market, you set your asking price at $350,000. Your minimum price may be $320,000. If you are offered your minimum, you sell. If you are offered lower, you don't sell. It sounds simple.

 

Unfortunately, in this mindset, you box yourself into a limited deal. You want to be flexible when negotiating. Let us review our last example. The buyer offers $300,000. The seller rejects and counters with the minimum of $320,000.

 

The buyer counters with $305,000 again. Where do you go from here? You have already offered your lowest minimum counteroffer. The only recourse would be to repeat your same offer.

 

One strategy would be to counter lower at $315,000. Or what if the buyer is willing to pay more than your minimum?

 

The buyer might be willing to pay $330,000. You will actually have lost money again by countering too low.

 

There are housing situations where you are just lucky to be paying off the mortgage, commission, and closing costs. You might be offered a little less but you accept to some cash to save your credit. In this case, setting a minimum price would be reasonable.

 

If you do feel the need to set a minimum counter price, don't set it in stone.

 

Try to Get a Sense of the Buyer

 

Your counteroffer is not the final transaction. It is one step in the negotiating process. You counter. The buyer will counter your offer. You will then counter back. This process will repeat until the a deal is made.

 

Therefore, your counteroffer should not be your best and lowest. The buyer's first offer is usually a low-ball offer. A seller's first counter is a high-ball offer. Both parties are testing to see how the other will respond.

 

Let the buyer know you are willing to negotiate. You ask $340,000, the buyer offers $300,000. You counter $335,000. You must also send the message that you are not willing to drop your price too much.

 

Some buyers will cave and accept the counteroffer and others will not. Anytime you reject and counter, you are opening negotiations but you are also taking the risk of losing the deal.

 

There are some buyers who are just looking for a desperate seller. They make a lot of low-ball offers until they find the property. You are not going to find a good price with that type of buyer.

 

Others will counter with close to what they originally offered, in this case say $305,000 (now you're still $30,000 apart).

 

What if You're Close Together in Price?

 

After a few counters, you are only a few thousand dollars apart. You countered at $335,000 and the buyer countered back at $330,000. Now you're only $5000 apart. Should you accept the buyer's counter?

 

You can simply accept the deal. Another strategy would be to tell the buyer or the agent you want to split the difference. They accept. You will then have sold your property at $332,500.

 

Splitting the difference can be an effective way of closing out negotiations to bring about a win-win situation.

 

What If You're Far Apart?

 

You counter at $335,000 and the buyer counters at $305,000. You're $30,000 apart. That's serious money.

 

There are only two ways of handling this situation. You could hold your original counter. The buyer would understand that this is your final offer. This could be a deal breaker. If you are highly motivated to sell, a steep decline of your price would get the ball rolling again. You counter at $320,000 saying this is your best but last offer.

 

This action could spark the buyer's interest. He/She could accept or at least make a higher counteroffer.

 

Is There a Time to Walk Away?

 

There are only two reasons to walk away from negotiations. You are truly angry and will not lower your price.

 

The second is for effect. You are willing to take less, but you want the buyer to think you've made your last, best offer. You say, "Take my last offer or leave it. I'll give you an hour to decide."

 

As a tactic, walking away can start negotiations. You could get your price or lose the deal.

 

There are no guarantees when negotiating real estate. The final outcome is often determined by the following percentages:

 

10%--how good you are at negotiating

45%--how motivated you are to sell

45%--how motivated the buyer is to purchase

100%--luck

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

Sellers: Rejecting the Buyer's first offer

Posted on May 13, 2014 at 11:25 AM Comments comments (0)

This type of strategy works best in a normal to hot seller's market. Rejecting the first offer might cost you the deal but in the long run you could end up coming out ahead. Use this information as more of guideline than a rule.

 

In a cold market, depending on the number of offers, rejecting the first offer may not be the wisest choice. For example, the market prices are depressed. You have your first bite in six months. It is safe to assume that this may be your only offer and you should accept it.

 

Why should you reject the first offer?

 

A buyer's first offer does not always reflect the buyer's highest bid for your property. From the buyer's perspective, there are three goals in making the offer:

 

Buyer's Goals in Making an Offer

 

1. To get the property for the lowest possible price.

2. To get the best possible terms.

3. To "feel out" the seller to see how "motivated" he or she is.

 

All of these goals speak toward making a low initial offer. Why offer $300,000 to a seller that might accept $270,000? Always offer the lower amount first. If the seller doesn't accept it, you can always offer a higher bid.

 

When the Market's Super Hot

 

In some areas of the country and at different times, there is such a high demand for property but a shortage of land. Multiple Offers come in as soon as the property is listed (sometimes before the listing is even published!). In this situation, desperate buyers make their highest and best offer first. The seller has a choice again to reject the first offer. After all, someone else is likely standing in line to offer more!

 

Will the buyer Offer More?

 

In a normal market, the answer is "maybe." If the buyer low-balled the first offer, then indeed they will offer more. Even if the buyers offered what they considered their best, they might stretch and still offer more if they really want to buy your house.

 

The market is fluid and stands still for no one. You never know what a buyer's thinking, or what other properties a buyer is considering. In the time since the first offer was made, the buyers may have reconsidered. They may have decided that they really don't want to buy into another house. Perhaps they'll rent for a time. Maybe they've seen another house that they like better.

 

This is the risk you take when you reject any offer. You may not get another offer from this buyer. You may not even get this buyer to come back and honor the original offer. The consequences do sound scary but if you want the most for your house then this is the tactic to consider.

 

Counter Offers

 

If you don't accept the buyer's offer exactly as presented within the time frame it is offered, you've rejected it. Now it's time to make a counter offer.

 

You don't both accept and counter. The moment you make a counter offer for a different price or terms, it's a whole new ball game. The buyer is under no obligation to accept your counter offer and can now accept or reject it.

 

You should always counter any offer that you reject, no matter how frivolous the original offer may seem. I've been in a situation (in a normal market) where a would-be buyer came in with an offer that was 25 percent less than I was asking. The house was listed at $200,000 and the offer was for $150,000.

 

Now, that's an affront. It is insulting to be offered so much less that the asking price, particularly since the house didn't have any particular problems that could have knocked down the price. My gut reaction was to tell this would-be buyer to take a great flying leap and simply forget about him.

 

However, this is business and you never know what a buyer is thinking, So I counter back, at $5000 below the asking price, indicating that I was firm and would not budge. You know what? The buyer accepted! He had simply been low-balling me to see if I was a desperate seller.

 

The point here is even if you think the buyer is insulting you, even if you think the buyer is insulting you, even if you can't stand to think about this ridiculous buyer, always counter.

 

Once you've decided to reject a would-be buyer's offer, it doesn't cost you anything to counter. You can counter for close to your asking price, your actual asking price, or even for more than you're asking! What's important is that you not be the one to close the negotiations off. Keep them open by countering.

 

When Should You Accept the First Offer?

 

There are time when you should accept the first offer, and it doesn't always have to do with market conditions. You may be desperate to sell. It could be a matter of a financial crisis (you've lost your job and can't make the payments), a divorce, a transfer, or any of a dozen other problems that have cropped up. The point here is that you need to get out now, and you can't afford to dicker. When your back is up against the wall, you may not be able to risk negotiating for a higher price. You may simply have to accept what's on the table.

 

Hopefully, you'll never be in this position. But if you are, recognize the situation for what it is and act accordingly.

 

Never gamble if you can't afford to lose. Never reject an offer you can't live without.

 

If you are thinking about selling your home, hiring the right agent the first time is crucial. The exposure and effort I give my sellers is hard to match, and I'd love the opportunity to show you what I do. I have a verifiable track record of taking over a stale listing, and selling it quickly for a higher price. I can provide actual addresses and client referrals to verify what I can promise.

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

 

 

For Sale By Owner! Why People Are Afraid To Buy From You...

Posted on May 13, 2014 at 11:25 AM Comments comments (0)

Many homeowners believe that to maximize their profit on a home sale they should sell it themselves. At first glance, they feel selling a home is simple and why should they pay a broker fees for something they could do themselves? In fact, close to 20% of all the homes sold last year were sold for sale by owner (FSBO).

However, close to half of the FSBO’s said that they would hire a professional next time they sold. Thirty percent said they were unhappy with the results they achieved by choosing FSBO. Why?

 

Many FSBO’s told us that the time, paperwork and everyday responsibilities involved were not worth the amount of money they saved in commissions. For others, the financial savings were even more disappointing. By the time they figured the amount of fees paid to outside consultants, inspectors, appraisers, title lawyers, escrow and loan officers, marketing, advertising... they would have been better off having paid the broker’s fee which would have included many of these charges up front.

 

Selling a home requires an intimate understanding of the real estate market. If the property is priced too high, it will sit and develop a reputation for being a problem property. If the property is priced too low, you will cost yourself serious money. Some FSBO’s discovered that the lost money as a result of poor decisions outweighed the commission.

 

Before you decide to sell FSBO, consider these questions and weigh the answers of assuming the responsibility versus employing a professional. A little time spent investigating up front will pay off tenfold in the end.

 

Questions To Consider:

 

Do I have the time, energy, know-how, and ability to devote a full forced effort to sell my home?

 

One of the keys to selling your home efficiently and profitably is complete accessibility. Many homes have sat on the market much longer than necessary because the owner was unwilling or unavailable to show the property. Realize that a certain amount of hours each day is necessary to sell your home.

 

Am I prepared to deal with an onslaught of buyers who perceive FSBO’s as targets for low balling?

 

One of the challenges of selling a home is screening unqualified prospects and dealing with low ballers. It often goes unnoticed... how much time, effort and expertise it requires to spot these people quickly. Settling for a lowball bid is usually worse than paying broker commissions.

 

Am I offering financing options to the buyer? Am I prepared to answer questions about financing?

 

One of the keys to selling, whether it’s a home, a car... anything, is to have all the necessary information the prospective buyer needs and to offer them options. Think about the last time you purchased something of value, did you make a decision before you had all your ducks in a row? By offering financing options you give the home buyer the ability to work on their terms and open up the possibilities of selling your home quickly and more profitably. A professional real estate agent will have a complete team, from lenders to title reps for you to utilize...they’ll be at your disposal.

 

Do I fully understand the legal ramifications and necessary steps required in selling a home?

 

Many home sales have been lost due to incomplete paperwork, lack of inspections or not meeting your states disclosure laws. Are you completely informed of all the steps necessary to sell real estate? If not, a professional would be a wise choice.

 

Do I have the capability of handling the legal contracts, agreements and any disputes with buyers before or after the offer is presented?

 

Ask yourself if you are well versed in legalese and if you are prepared to handle disputes with buyers. To avoid any disputes it is wise to put all negotiations and agreements in writing. Many home sales have been lost due to misinterpretation of what was negotiated.

 

Have I contacted the necessary professionals....title, inspector (home and pest), attorney, and escrow company?

 

Are you familiar with top inspectors and escrow companies? Don’t randomly select inspectors, attorneys, and title reps. Like any profession there are inadequate individuals who will slow, delay and possibly even cost you the transaction.

 

To search all homes for sale like a Realtor, get a free market analysis of your home, mortgage help, or to check out local places and events, go to:

 

www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

Currently recruiting new prospective first time home buyers, 2nd home buyers, and investors. Here is your mission:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfzMvY8wPaQ&rel=0

 

25 Best Places to Retire - Cape Coral, FL

Posted on April 16, 2014 at 10:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Population: 154,300

% over 50: 38%

Median home price: $95,000

Top state income tax: None

Cost of living index: 96

For retirees who are looking for lower taxes, cheap housing and a gentle climate, Cape Coral scores on all fronts. Home prices here, for example, have fallen more than 60% since the 2006 peak. For homebuyers, that means a lot of bang for the buck: A newly renovated three-bedroom, 1,800-square-foot house with a pool was recently bought here for $145,000.

 

Lots of Florida towns have seen dramatic price drops, of course, but Cape Coral has something else going for it: It's paradise for water lovers. The town is sliced with 400 miles of canals, half of which have access to the Gulf of Mexico, about 20 minutes away by boat.

 

This quiet place doesn't offer much nightlife. But there's a public golf course, a weekly farmers' market with live music, and a nearby outlet mall. Training camps for the Boston Red Sox and Minnesota Twins are just 15 minutes away.

 

If you would like more information about Cape Coral, or would like to search homes for sale like a Realtor, find your home's current market value, or just learn more about our area and real estate,visit www.capecoralfortmyershomesonline.com

 

From CNNMoney.com

http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/real_estate/1109/gallery.best_places_retire.moneymag/2.html


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